Art / Mexico / Travel

Happy Día de Muertos

IMG_3822 - Version 3

Hands down, my favorite piece of Mexican pottery is the Day of The Dead Wedding Couple. This is one of the most hilarious and delightful pieces of art that I’ve seen in forever. I liked it so much that I can see this pair sitting atop my tombstone. That would wake up the neighbors.

Be sure you check out today’s Google Doodle. 🙂

Happy Trails and RIP,
James

41 thoughts on “Happy Día de Muertos

  1. Love this piece of pottery you’ve shared . . . and the Google Doodle! I was never very interested in Day of the Dead, but I’m warming up to what it signifies more than all the little skeleton things for sale. Thanks for sharing one you love with us.

    • I always enjoyed the DOD art Rusha, but didn’t understand the meaning of the holiday until our visit to Mexico earlier this year. We saw some cheap tourist trinkets, but most of the art we saw was high caliber and interesting. It’s always fun to see colors used with reckless abandon. ~James

    • The DOD art that we saw had obviously gone through a metamorphosis from the early days, but the results were fun and interesting. Like a New Orleans funeral, the holiday is a mixture of celebration and serious. ~James

  2. That colourful couple would definitely be an eye-opener among the more subdued and traditional monuments in the cemetery! 🙂

    … but I didn’t get anything but the regular google logo 😦

    • I tried the link on my end Joanne, and it worked just fine. All I can suggest is trying a different browser. It’s worth the effort because it’s an excellent, artistic explanation of the holiday set to cool Mexican music. Hope you can make it work, and Happy DOD. ~James

    • The Latin American holiday has its serious side, but much of the art has a distinct sense of humor, and for lots of folks it’s party time. In fact, most of my favorite pieces were hilarious. ~James

  3. Moving from macabre to humor, what I love about Mexican Day of the Dead art. Your choice is marvelous, and oh that mustache. Go for it on your tombstone. I promise to come and visit— if I am still around. 🙂

  4. Pingback: The Day of the Dead… A Brief Interlude | Wandering through Time and Place

    • It’s interesting that in the US, we find the association of skeletons with death as offensive, when in reality it’s totally natural. The Latin Americans have a good attitude about it all. ~James

      • I’ll do my best 🙂 Actually, was it you that I was chatting to about John Irving’s latest? I’m struggling through it at the moment – Last night in Twisted River. It seems never-ending!

      • No it wasn’t me Linda, but I did check out the review and Publisher’s Weekly (pretty reliable in my view) says: “Irving (The World According to Garp) returns with a scattershot novel, the overriding themes, locations and sensibilities of which will probably neither surprise longtime fans nor win over the uninitiated.” What do you think? ~James

      • Yeah, I have to agree with that! His earlier stuff was much better – if this was the first book of his I’d read, I wouldn’t read another one.

  5. Great piece!

    We celebrated things a little differently here in Guatemala at the kite festivals of Santigo Sacatepéquez and Sumpango!!

    A great, colourful day!

  6. Love this couple! I was in Taos in February and the Dia de los Muertos theme is everywhere — with the skeletal couple taking center stage. I love sugar skulls as well, and I decorated some with my kids this year. Thanks for the post, James!

    • Thanks Steph. We saw lots of wonderful DOD crafts in Morelia – really high quality stuff that I’ll eventually do a post on. The area around this city seems to be an epicenter for the holiday in Mexico. All the best in the New Year. ~James

    • I love this piece as well Peggy, and I’d love to own it, but where to put it? When I visited Xian, I came dangerously close to buying a full-size replica of a warrior, which in retrospect, would have been a huge mistake. Luckily I didn’t succumb in Mexico either. ~James

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